Good Memory Tips For A Healthy Mind

Having good memory  is an added advantage to healthy aging. Memory loss is always relevant to old age and posts many problems to the seniors. Having a good memory at old age keeps one active and enjoys most of the evidence of old age.

To this effects many has researched to come out with many tips to help keep your mind healthy and active as you grow older. Solving the problem of good memory at old age is just like solving the most of the problems associated with old age. Good brain health is the ability to think clearly and to continue to live your life as you have before.

The bad news?

Researchers are still unsure of exactly what causes cognitive impairment. Diagnosis is often late and treatments remain elusive. “Alzheimer’s is our main nemesis,” says Wahlestedt, who notes that dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are milder forms of deteriorating brain health.

The good news?

Our understanding of the diseases and how to prevent them is evolving rapidly.

THE BRAIN AS A COMPUTER

Before we thought the brain was a very static thing, that you were born with a number of cells and that the brain was unable to repair,” says Dr. Carlos Ramirez-Mejia, a neurologist in Baptist Hospital’s neuroscience department.“But now we know that up to a certain age the brain is able to create new connections and activate different areas when you create a need for them.”“Think of nerve cells as a computer in the brain,” explains Wahlestedt. “All the wires have to be there for it to work. Nerve cells connect to other nerve cells and create these networks.

If some of the cells die off, the networks will not be complete or functional. Accordingly, prevention efforts revolve around building strong, healthy nerve cells from day one.

Check This: Goat Milk Benefits.

EARLY PREVENTION

We make it clear that you’re never too young to start thinking about good health,” adds Dr. Ralph Sacco, professor and chairman of neurology at University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and immediate past president of the American Heart Association.“The risk of cognitive impairment goes up with age, but it takes many years of unregulated behaviors to impact it — start doing something now versus doing something later.”Motivated?

Here are five ways to start improving your brain health today.

Eat a healthy diet

Studies have shown that people who have a heart healthy, Mediterranean-style diet of mostly fish, legumes, vegetables and olive oil tend to have better brain health, reports Dr. Po-Heng Tsai, a neurologist at Cleveland Clinic Florida. A healthy brain diet looks a lot like a healthy heart diet. Avoid foods rich in cholesterol and bad fats and load up on fruits, vegetables, good fats and antioxidants.

Exercise often

Exercise keeps your brain healthy, Wahlestedt says.“The brain is dependent on blood from the body, so it’s not a good thing if your arteries are really bad at supporting the brain.” Specific recommendations vary by individual, but in general, longer durations and higher intensities are advised. Physical activity is always the trickiest recommendation. People who are older may not be as physically active, but if you’re doing less, do it a little longer.

Reduce stress

Every time you’re under stress you produce a lot of hormones that are used in response to threat, Ramirez-Mejia. These hormones go to the brain and are very toxic. When you expose a rat to discharges of those chemicals, parts of the brain start to die. Reduce stress when possible by removing yourself from stressful situations, exercising, listening to music and/or practicing breathing techniques.

Sleep better

It is critical for the brain to process information while you’re sleeping, Ramirez-Mejia says. Your body seems to be at rest, but your brain is actually quite active storing memories and processing information from the day. If you’re not sleeping well, your memory and brain function will be impaired.

Be mentally, socially active

The brain needs to learn new things, Ramirez-Mejia says. The moment it stops learning new things it goes into this mode where it becomes really efficient at the simple activities of daily living but doesn’t make any effort to make new connections.

A brain that has more connections is a more efficient brain and is less prone to Alzheimer’s and dementia” Learning can be learning a new language, acquiring a new skill, playing an instrument, doing mathematical calculations, exploring the world or planning things for the future — seeing life in the long-term.

LOOKING AHEAD

Right now because of the aging population, the predictions for the year 2050 are pretty bleak, Sacco says. “The number of people living into 70s and 80s are going way up, so projections for Alzheimer’s, dementia and strokes are projected to increase unless we can do something by changing some of these behaviors.” The goal now is to produce more connections and build a more dense network, Ramirez-Mejia adds. In the future there will be medications.

Effects Of vitamin E For The Body

Vitamin E is not a single substance, but a group of substances that include four types of tocopherols (alpha, beta, gamma and delta). In humans, alpha-tocopherol is the most effective one. Vitamin E supplements usually contain only alpha-tocopherol. Vitamin E can not be produced by the body so we have to get them from food. The main sources of vitamin E are vegetables, fruits and grains such as corn, papaya, avocado, beans and cooking oil. Vitamin E can be damaged by heating and storage. The food processing industry, often adds synthetic vitamin E into foods to compensate for losses.

The function of vitamin E in the body

Vitamin E has several functions in the body. As vitamin C and A, vitamin E is a natural antioxidant works to neutralize free radicals, aggressive molecules that damage the body cells. The number of free radicals can be rise by stress, smoking or exposure to sunlight. Because free radicals increase the risk of diseases such as cancer, heart disease or cataracts, antioxidants can reduce the risk of this disease to a certain extent. Vitamin E also supports the body’s defenses and protect against atherosclerosis (hardening of arteries).

The need for vitamin E

Doses of vitamin E is expressed in milligrams and IU (International Unit) which is a special unit for vitamins and other biologically active substances. IU definition is different for each vitamin. There is no equivalence between the different vitamins and even between species within a group of vitamins. For instance, one IU of vitamin E does not have the same amount with one IU of vitamin A.

One IU of natural vitamin E have different numbers with one IU of synthetic vitamin E. We just need vitamin E in very small amounts in each day, only 14 milligrams for men and 12 milligrams for adult women. Pregnant and nursing women need a little more. The need for vitamin E also increased in people who smoke, stress, heart disease and low immunity.The most common amount recommended for vitamin E supplementation in adults is 400 to 800 IU per day.

However, some experts advise to just take 100 to 200 IU per day, because the long-term study showed that there was no additional benefit from the intake that exceeds that amount.

Vitamin E deficiency

Vitamin E deficiency is rare. Most people get enough vitamin E through their diet. Vitamin E is a fat soluble vitamin, which means that our bodies can store this vitamin in the liver as a reserve. As long as you eat a variety of foods such as vegetables, fruits, grains and moderate amounts of unsaturated fats from vegetable oils, you get enough vitamin E for every day needs.Vitamin E supplementation is not required. Our bodies will take vitamin E from reserve in the liver if we get less intake of vitamin E from food. We will have shortage of vitamin E, if we eat foods low in vitamin E continually in a long time.

Vitamin E deficiency can also be caused by impaired absorption in the intestine (eg, malabsorption of fat) and other conditions. People with a genetic defect in the protein that transfers vitamin E, called thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) had severe vitamin E deficiency, characterized by low blood pressure and progressive neurological disorder.

Older people with diabetes also tend to show a significant reduction of vitamin E in their blood serum. Vitamin E deficiency can lead to severe symptoms such as poor in concentration, muscle weakness, and increased susceptibility to infection.

Overdose of vitamin E

As a fat-soluble vitamin, vitamin E can accumulate in the body, making it more risky than water-soluble vitamins. High doses of vitamin E (especially if taken over the long term) can cause several problems, such as fatigue, weakness, headache, nausea, diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, and increased risk of bleeding